Subdivisions

Municipal Planning Services (2009) Ltd. is contracted as the M.D. of Wainwright's subdivision authority. All completed applications are submitted to Municipal Planning Services (2009) Ltd. and they retain all revenue for the process. Information outlining the subdivision process and associated costs can be downloaded below.

All subdivision applications are referred to the M.D. of Wainwright as part of the approval process.

Ratepayers may wish to contact the Development Department to provide some general information about their land and proposal, and to discuss whether their proposed subdivision would meet the guidelines outlined in the Land Use Bylaw, Municipal Development Plan, Intermunicipal Development Plan or the Municipal Government Act.

Visit the Municipal Planning Services (2009) Ltd. website for more subdivision information:www.munplan.ab.ca

What Is A Subdivision?

Generally, a subdivision creates more than one title from one titled area. For instance:

  • If a person owns a quarter section and wants to sell a portion of that quarter section to another person, or if he wants to sell off most of the quarter section and keep a small portion for himself, he needs a subdivision.
  • If a person owns a part of a quarter section and wants to do the same, he needs a subdivision.
  • If a person owns a Lot or a Block on a Plan and wants to do the same, he needs a subdivision.
  • If a person owns a quarter section, a part of a quarter section, a Lot, or a Block and he wants to sell several portions of that area to several persons, he needs s subdivision.
  • If a person owns several Lots or Blocks on a Plan and wants to create more Lots or Blocks, he needs a subdivision.
  • If a person owns a titled area which is split by a road, a railroad, a river, or a lake, and he wants to divide the titled area using the road, railroad, river or lake as a boundary, he needs a subdivision.
  • If a person owns, in one title, several Lots on a Plan registered prior to July 1, 1950 (prior to Plan 1966 HW) and he wants to divide them into separate titles, he needs a subdivision.
  • If a person or two people own two titled areas (parts of quarter sections, Lots, or Blocks) and they want to change the boundaries of the titled areas (do a boundary adjustment), they need a subdivision.

What Is The Whole Subdivision Process?

Generally, an application for subdivision goes through the following steps:

  • Submission of a completed application with the required fee
  • Referral to municipal staff, school divisions, utility companies, and government departments, among other agencies, for comment
  • Notification of subdivision application to adjacent landowners and receipt of input
  • Decision (tentative approval, tentative approval with conditions, or refusal), normally within 60 days
  • Appeal period (19 days) - potential appeal to Subdivision and Development Appeal Board or Municipal Government Board by applicant or provincial agency - not by neighbours
  • Fulfillment of any conditions specified in the decision
  • Submission of a Descriptive Plan, Plan of Survey, or other instrument to Municipal Planning Services (2009) Ltd. together with the required fee for endorsement (final approval)
  • Registration of the Plan or document at the Alberta Land Titles Office

What Are The Subdivision Costs?

Generally, the costs for a subdivision are as follows:

  • Fee due at application
  • Fulfillment of any conditions specified in the decision (dependent on conditions - may include building roads, accesses, sewer and water lines, etc., off-site levies, etc.)
  • Preparation of Descriptive Plan or Plan of Survey to effect plan (contact an Alberta Land Surveyor to discuss costs)
  • Fee due at endorsement (final approval)
  • Registration of the Plan and/or other instruments at the Alberta Land Titles Office (check with Land Titles - currently about $200 plus transfer taxes (if a transfer involved))
  • All charges are subject to G.S.T.

How Long Does A Subdivision Take?

Generally, a subdivision takes:

  • From submission of completed application to tentative approval - normally no more than 60 days
  • Appeal period - 19 days
  • ulfillment of any conditions specified in the decision - as long as the landowner wants - can be 1 week, can be up to a year, in the landowner’s control
  • Subdivision approvals are only valid for 1 year, at which time a final plan (Descriptive Plan or Plan of Survey) must have been submitted to Municipal Planning Services (2009) Ltd. for final approval. Extensions for an additional year can be requested, but the extension request does not have to be granted. As well, there may be a small fee ($25.00 or $50.00, plus G.S.T., depending on the number of lots in the subdivision - but no fee for a “first parcel out” or a “physical fragmentation”) for an extension.
  • Final approval or endorsement - normally 1 or 2 days
  • Registration of the Plan and/or other instruments at the Alberta Land Titles Office - normally 2 or 3 working days